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press, helpful links, etc︎︎︎


I started @depthsofwikipedia on Instagram amidst quarantine boredom and it’s now expanded to TikTok and TwitterIt’s been featured in:

+New York Times: “Want to See the Weirdest of Wikipedia? Look No Further.”
+New Yorker: “Wikipedia, in the flesh”
+The Guardian: “Mining for gold in the Depths of Wikipedia”
+NPR : “You can find anything on Wikipedia — even the weird and wacky”
+Vice : “I look for the weirdest and wildest things on Wikipedia. Here’s what I’ve learned.”
+Buzzfeed Video Creator Spotlight: “Weird Wikipedia Facts”
+Mashable: “Travel down a Wikipedia rabbit hole with the mastermind behind Depths of Wikipedia on Instagram”
+Wikimedia Diff : From the Depths of Wikipedia: an interview with Wikimedian and influencer Annie Rauwerda

+Forbes: “The Weirdest Entries on Wikipedia. Creator Spotlight: @depthsofwikipedia”
+ i-D : “This account dug up the weirdest things on Wikipedia.”
+Inside Hook : “How one Instagram account finds the weirdest stuff on Wikipedia”
+Lithium Magazine : “The viral Instagram page diving into the depths of Wikipedia”



+Mentioned in New York Times Cooking, New York Times Styles, Smithsonian Magazine, Eater, Vox
+Stats from Wikipedia edit-a-thon